Movie review: Terrifier (2018)

Trf_Terrifier_titlepage

Nerd time: Terrifier’s title font screams 1980s exploitation. It delivers on this big time.

Movie review: Terrifier (2018)

Cast

  • Jenna Kanell as Tara
  • Samantha Scaffidi as Victoria
  • David Howard Thornton as Art the Clown
  • Catherine Corcoran as Dawn
  • Pooya Mohseni as Cat Lady
  • Matt McAllister as Mike the Exterminator
  • Katie Maguire as Monica Brown
  • Gino Cafarelli as Steve
  • Cory Duval as Coroner
  • Michael Leavy as Will the Exterminator
  • Director: Damien Leone

No spoilers

Trf_selfie_sersl

Well hellooo there. Everyone, meet Art the Clown. He’s nucking futs.

It’s a dark and dirty Halloween night. On TV a talk show hostess interviews a horribly mutilated girl. Two other girls are out on the streets, dressed in super-slutty costumes for the night, and now walking home in the dark. They drop into a friendly pizzeria to commiserate over their evening. But they’ve caught the attention of a terrifying clown carrying a highly suspicious black rubbish sack, and now those two girls are in his sights. I don’t think he’s playing, ladies. Oh yes, something very, very bad is going to happen this evening…and trust us, this clown makes Michael Myers look like My Little Pony.

Trf_hapless_heroines

Just a perfectly safe walk home on Halloween. Right?

When ‘Art’ the clown begins the hunt it’s not long before there’s blood and body parts all over the place. As our heroines try to escape, his kills get very twisted and extremely nasty. Art is a memorable horror villain, able to make you squirm and laugh and scream simultaneously. He treats everything as a joke, but the joke’s deadly serious. Once he sets his sights on you, you’d best run for it and pray for morning. This is actually really good, with some real tension and engaging characters who are mostly quite sympathetic. I honestly cared what happened to them, despite some paper-thin writing. The film even has the sense to give the background characters some halfway-decent dialogue, which makes them feel a little more alive before they’re added to the body-count. But don’t get too attached to anyone, as you can always trust Art to do the worst thing. And oh man, it gets pretty fucking bad…

Trf_side_bloody_clown

Eep.

Terrifier is a short, nasty trip into horror; a bloody, gleeful return to those graphically violent, gonna-get-you-for-no-reason exploitation films from the 1970s and ’80s. This throwback knows its roots and thank goodness, the special effects have come a long way. So be warned. It gets unapologetically gross, and even upsetting to anyone who has a shred of empathy left – even after too many horror films, but the horror genre excels at pushing boundaries. It should sometimes be just about using amazing special effects work to generate a disgusted ‘what did I just see?’ reaction from the bloody-thirsty horror-fan audiences. It’s so over the top it’s kind of…funny? Or is that just this Eyeball’s view? It’s all about perspective, guys.

So watch Terrifier for a front row seat to full-on Grand Guignol, if that’s your thing, because Terrifier knows exactly who it’s aiming this at. Namely, those with strong stomachs. But if you don’t have a strong stomach, then you’d better run for the exits before Art the Clown locks you in with him for the night, and hide before he gets out his rusty, blood-spattered saw…

Trf_girl_hiding1_clown

You can run, but can you hide?

Spoilers (including for Bone Tomahawk)

Continue reading

Advertisements

Quickie review: ‘Slut’ short film (2014)

Slut (2014)

Directed By: Chloe Okuno Produced By: Lisa Gollobin Written By: Chloe Okuno Main Cast: Molly McIntyre, James Gallo, Kasia Pilewicz, Cody Beverstock, Alex Miller, and Sally Kirkland

Seeing exploitation horror done right is always a pleasure and ‘Slut’ (which won best student short at Screamfest 2014.) is certainly up there. At just 20 minutes long, this 1970s-set thriller plays cleverly with its Little Red Riding Hood stalker theme, creating a kick-ass story in the process.

Poor bespectacled Maddy just wants to be seen as an attractive teenage girl in her  dust bowl town, but is treated as a complete joke by the other teenagers at the RollerRink. However, after dressing up to compete with the prettiest girl in town, Maddy soon catches the wrong sort of attention.

Maddy is sympathetic and the film doesn’t waste much time making the most of the situation. This is a smart, well made nod to the 1970s grindhouse, classics that mostly surpasses the exploitation cliches it comes from. Highly recommended.

Movie Review: Devil’s Chair (2007)

Movie review: Devil’s Chair (2007)

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Cast:

  • Andrew Howard as Nick West
  • Pollyanna Rose as Sammy
  • David Gant as Doctor Willard
  • Louise Griffiths as Melissa
  • Elize du Toit as Rachel Fowles
  • Matt Berry as Brett Wilson

Without spoilers:

Some films are so bad they’re good (or good enough). This distinctly odd low-budget feature is one of those. Starring Izzy from Hollyoaks (Elise du Toit), the money-lending bad guy from Limitless (Andrew Howard) and the now very established Matt Berry, I’d been aware of this film for a long time and always intended to see it. Back in 2006, I’d been intrigued by the original trailer that promised a nightmare inducing monster and plenty of gore. Now that I’ve finally caught it for 99p, over ten years since its release, I’m caught between acknowledging it’s kind of awful, but impressed that it mostly delivered on what I was hoping for.

It centres around an unwise investigation into an insane asylum. A bunch of academics and a survivor investigate the ‘devil’s chair’ which apparently caused a big mess several years ago. The characters bicker constantly – it’s always a fine line between that attitude being fun, and making me hate the characters. In this case it leans towards the latter. Particularly annoying is Matt Berry’s ‘Brett’ character (named for Alien’s Brett perhaps) who takes ‘entitled rich arsehole’ to new levels. Maybe it’s more grating because I’ve seen him in other things, but in Devil’s Chair he tries for the funnybone, intentionally or not, and it’s quite jarring compared with the rest of the cast’s efforts. His magnificent voice actually works against him in this case.

In contrast, Nick West’s constant narration about how much he hates the university schmucks drags the whole story down, bashing on and on with his repetitious contempt – we get it, you truly loathe the academics and think you’re better than anyone else there – but it does, at least, serve a purpose.

If you can get past the awkwardness of its presentation, there’s plenty here for gorehounds. Clocking in at 91 minutes, it doesn’t overstay its welcome, and gleefully straddles that awkward, camp-yet-nasty area that the Human Centipede movies squirm around in. Whilst its monster is pretty great, and the twist even greater, this is definitely not a GOOD flick. But if you can get past the smug-bastard voiceover – which does ultimately serve a purpose – then it’s a bloody good ride into low-budget madness.

DC_creature_elisa_crawl_bw

The devil advances. Might be best to watch in a darkish room. Light is the enemy of horror film watching!

Review with SPOILERS below – going to go into detail here about events in the film, decisions of characters. Do not proceed further unless you really want to know what happens. Also don’t read its wikipedia entry, which summarises the entirety of the plot for some reason.

Continue reading

Monster Mondays: Michael Myers

A horror icon stalks the Haunted Eyeball this Monday, care of guest author, and award-winning horror writer, Chris Davis. She tells the Eyeball why Michael Myers (Halloween, 1978) is the nastiest monster of all, and why she still can’t look away.

Halloween (1978)

Call me sick. Call me twisted. Call me whatever you want, but for the love of all that’s unholy, do not paint a William Shatner mask white, wear it and come after me with a butcher knife. Continue reading